Article 24 of the Federal Constitution of Malaysia (“Constitution”) states that any citizen who has acquired citizenship of another country may be deprived of Malaysian citizenship. This is perhaps the reason for the general understanding that Malaysians are not allowed to have dual citizenship. But what happens then to individuals who obtain foreign citizenship in…

In an earlier article entitled “Citizenship for Adopted Children – A Malaysian Perspective [2013] 1 MLJ xiii”, we described the story of a child who was given up for adoption by his biological parents and was subsequently adopted by Malaysian citizens. In the judicial review proceedings, the parents sought from the High Court declarations that…

Friday, 17 March, 2020 11:00am – 11:45am  Citizenship for Adopted Children and Stateless Individuals  About this talk Stateless individuals face a lifetime of uncertainty and discrimination and the process of being recognised as a Malaysian citizen is full of challenges. This is despite the fact that they may have been born in Malaysia and lived…

Thursday, 26 March, 2020 12:30pm – 2:30pm  Citizenship for Adopted Children and Stateless Individuals (Download pdf brochure ) Overview Stateless individuals face a lifetime of uncertainty and discrimination and the process of being recognised as a Malaysian citizen is full of challenges. This is despite the fact that they may have been born in Malaysia and…

Our associate, Jasmine Wong, spoke as a panelist at UndiMsia!Chat on Citizenship & Statelessness. The event was organized by the Malaysian Centre for Constitutionalism and Human Rights (MCCHR) and the United Kingdom Malaysian Law Students’ Association (KPUM) on 12.9.2019 to raise awareness on the legal battle for equal citizenship rights by the residents of our…

In a recent interview with LexisNexis Malaysia, our Managing Partner, Raymond Mah, shared his experience in handling citizenship and statelessness litigation since 2009. He explained the legislation gaps, procedure for pursuing citizenship in the courts and the issues arising from his recent Federal Court matters. The Federal Court appeals were settled amicably in February 2019…

Thursday, March 22, 2018 12:30pm – 2:30pm     Citizenship for Adopted and Stateless Children (Download pdf brochure ) Overview Stateless children face a lifetime of uncertainty and discrimination. And the process of being recognised as a Malaysian citizen is full of challenges. This is despite the fact that they may have been born in Malaysia and…

By Raymond Mah & Liow Pei Xia The word “adoption” comes from the old French word “adoptare”, meaning “to choose for oneself.” Today, adoption refers to the act of legally taking another person’s child into your family to raise as your own. Adoptive parents may decide to adopt for many different reasons: some adopt due to infertility, some…

The Malaysian Adoption Act 1952 does not address the citizenship of adopted children. As a result, the nationality of adopted children in Malaysia has been determined arbitrarily by the National Registration Department (NRD) in the exercise of its administrative function of registering orders granted by the Malaysian courts. By refusing citizenship to many adopted children, the NRD has forced aggrieved parents to subsequently apply to the Minister of Home Affairs for citizenship for their adopted children, which decision is discretionary and beyond judicial review.